March 2017

In This Issue

CEO Welcome
 

How is CATSINaM working for you at a national level?
 

9th Closing the Gap Report
 

The Redfern Statement and Close the Gap Campaign
 

CATSINaM at conferences, forums and symposiums
 

Upcoming Events
 

​A new Indigenous Advisory Council

 

CATSINaM’s Nursing and Midwifery Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework 

Cultural Safety in the Enrolled Nurse Qualifications with the VET sector

Universities Australia Indigenous Strategy 2017-2020
 

Independent review of the health professional accreditation systems 
 

The new Cultural Respect Framework 2016-2026
 

CRANAplus – important issues for remote health
 

Have you been to our Vimeo site?


CEO Welcome 

So far, 2017 has run at a high pace for CATSINaM. Important developments on a national level, as well as our work on major initiatives this year are profiled in this Newsletter.

Along with other national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, CATSINaM has been directly involved with the Redfern Statement, which was re-presented to the Prime Minister on February 14th. This occurred on the same day the Prime Minister launched the 9th annual ‘Closing the Gap’ Report on progress against the COAG targets below. We hope the direction provided by the Redfern Statement and the learnings from the ‘Closing the Gap’ Report are heeded in the work that is currently underway to review and update the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan ‘Implementation Plan’.

In the lead-up to the May 2017 budget, our political engagement efforts have been important – this includes the two major sides of politics, as well as meeting with and promoting CATSINaM priorities with other parties and Independents. Two significant events include attending the Labor Party National Health Summit in early March, and hosting a CATSINaM Parliamentary Breakfast in late March with Coalition politicians and staff.

We acknowledge the appointment of a new Indigenous Advisory Council, and trust their advice will be respected and acted upon at a national level. Another new development is the advent of the Universities Australia ‘Indigenous Strategy 2017-2020’. We welcome the targets to raise the bar on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander recruitment, success and completion. This is consistent with our ongoing work to create and promote the Nursing and Midwifery Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework (see article below) and a Leaders in Nursing and Midwifery Education Network.

Our new major initiative is Cultural Safety in the Enrolled Nurse Qualifications with the VET sector, which will enable CATSINaM to expand how cultural safety is embedded across the nursing and midwifery education pathway. This initiative is in its early stages and we look forward to sharing our progress over 2017.

Kind regards,
Janine Mohamed


How is CATSINaM working for you at a national level?

Liaison with Australian and jurisdictional Health Departments

 

As a result of Janine Mohamed’s invitation to give a formal presentation about CATSINaM’s recent work to the Department of Health, Indigenous Health Division (IHD) in early February, the IHD requested to undertake CATSINaM’s Cultural Safety Training. We are very pleased at this response, and are currently negotiating to do this in June. We hope the training will assist the IHD to strengthen the capacity of individual staff and the Division as a whole to support and enable cultural safety in their work. Further, that they will appreciate why CATSINaM and other national Aboriginal health organisations have placed embedding cultural safety across the health system so high on their agendas.

 

Consultations on the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan ‘Implementation Plan’

 

The Department of Health, Indigenous Health Division, are currently holding consultations around the country in preparation for the next version of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP) Implementation Plan, which will be developed on the basis of reviewing progress against the 2018 deliverables listed in the plan. The NATSIHP was launched in 2013 when the Labour Party was in Government, and the NATSIHP Implementation Plan developed in 2015 under the Coalition Government.

 

Racism was officially identified as a social determinant of health –CATSINaM and the National Health Leadership Forum have advocated for this.


CATSINaM attended the national consultation in late March and is finalising a written submission. How the social determinants of health are addressed is a priority focus of the consultations, as this element of NATSIHP was not well developed in the 2015-2018 version of the Implementation Plan. Racism was officially identified as a social determinant of health – CATSINaM and the National Health Leadership Forum have consistently advocated for this.

In CATSINaM’s written submission, we will argue that all parts of the Implementation Plan (IP) remain important. However, the area in which there is slower and limited progress is ‘Health System Effectiveness’, and that new deliverables should be created for 2020/2021 to drive a faster pace of change, rather than staying with the five year gap.  Two aspects of this section are high on CATSINaM’s agenda – health workforce and cultural safety, which we will link to racism as a social determinant of health.
 

Political engagement

Labor Party National Health Summit

On 3 March 2017, Janine Mohamed attended the Labor Party’s National Health Summit. The Summit bought together more than 100 Australian health leaders to discuss opportunities and challenges for the Australian health system now and in the future to inform Labor’s policy renewal process.

We participated in discussions on primary, secondary and community care, and designing our health workforce for the future. We used the Summit to advocate for:

  • embedding cultural safety throughout the health system
  • developing birthing on country programs
  • increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives
  • encourage the establishment of a caucus of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations as an ongoing consultative forum to inform policy development.

CATSINaM March 28th Parliamentary Breakfast

CATSINaM held a Parliamentary Breakfast for politicians from the Coalition on March 28th that profiled CATSINaM’s work on recruiting and retaining the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nursing and midwifery workforce. The intention was to foster joint action with Government that results in more rapid improvements, and have this on their agenda in the lead-up to the May budget.

There were 23 people in attendance, including Members of Parliament and their staff. All in attendance received a ‘take home’ document, shown below, that summarised the existing challenges in nursing and midwifery, why they should be addressed, and recommended short terms investments they could make over the next three years.

Engaging with national nursing and midwifery processes

 

CATSINaM has recently provided input and advice into consultations on the Review of Enrolled Nurse Accreditation Standards to the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council and the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia’s public consultation on the revised codes of conduct for nurses and midwives. Our feedback to these consultation processes focused on advocating for a consistent approach to embedding cultural safety into the codes and standards. 


9th Closing the Gap Report

On 14th February 2017, the Prime Minister delivered the 9th annual Closing the Gap report. The report revealed that six of the seven closing the gap targets set by COAG are not on track, with the only target on track being the proportion of young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians who have achieved Year 12 or equivalent. Sadly, and of direct significance to our work as nurses and midwives, the target to halve the gap in child mortality is not on track with the latest data showing it is just outside the target. Achieving this target is now a focus for the new Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt.
 

…for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians with a university degree there is no employment gap.


Another finding of particular interest to CATSINaM is that for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians with a university degree there is no employment gap. This shows the importance of our work to increase the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to our professions, and the positive flow-on effects we all know this has for our families and communities.

In his statement to Parliament, the Prime Minister focused on the strength and resilience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the importance of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. As a member of the coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak organisations who presented the Redfern Statement to the Prime Minister prior to his speech, we hope to be part of this new relationship with the government. 


The Redfern Statement and Close the Gap Campaign

The Redfern Statement calls for self-determination, and policies and programs that are led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and CATSINaM stands ready to work with the government to advance our vision as part of this new relationship. You can watch this video to find out more about how the Redfern Statement is a blueprint for change.

A key part of our work on the Redfern Statement is as a member of the Close the Gap campaign for Indigenous health equality. The campaign delivered their 2017 Progress and Priorities Report on National Close the Gap Day, 16th March. The report calls for a reinvigorated national approach to addressing Indigenous health inequality; new strategies to address the social and cultural determinants of health; the implementation of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan and for the direct involvement of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations in the new Primary Health Networks. 


CATSINaM at conferences, forums and symposiums

Oxfam’s Straight Talk 2016 National Summit

The Straight Talk program holds both national and regional gatherings. Its purpose is to connect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women with the political system, and build the capacity of women as change makers. With a focus on practical tools and confidence, Straight Talk brings people together to share, learn and be effective in making a difference.

On behalf of CATSINaM, Janine Mohamed attended the recent national summit. We encourage you to look for opportunities to engage with Straight Talk in your jurisdictions.

Stepping Up Forum, NSW Health

Janine Mohamed played a significant role in NSW Health’s ‘Stepping Up Forum’ on March 22-23rd, which focused on their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment strategy. After delivering a plenary presentation on CATSINaM Nursing and Midwifery Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework, she then participated in a panel on the important role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Practitioners in multidisciplinary teams.

Finally, together with Kathleen Stacey, she ran a workshop on ‘Unpacking key terms in Aboriginal ‘cultural training’ - implications for learning and implementation’ in which over 40 people participated enthusiastically as they learned about the difference between cultural awareness and cultural safety training, and why cultural safety training is necessary for achieving change in both individual and organisational practices. 

Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 National Conference

CATSINaM was invited to deliver a plenary presentation to 100 health practitioners, academics and policy staff involved in eye health who attended this conference on March 16-17th in Melbourne, convened by the Indigenous Eye Health Unit at the University of Melbourne. Ben Gorrie, Victorian CATSINaM Board Member, teamed up with Kathleen Stacey, on behalf of Janine Mohamed, to discuss ‘Approaches to embedding cultural safety in individual and organisational practice’. Feedback from on the day from a range of participants, as well as from the Indigenous Eye Health Unit staff indicated this was very well received.


Upcoming Events 

We are holding our bi-annual Stakeholder and Member Forum Series across April and May – here are the dates in case you have not let us know you would like to attend:

  • Adelaide: 5 April
  • Melbourne: 6 April
  • Darwin: 18 April
  • Cairns: 26 April
  • Brisbane: 27 April
  • Hobart: 10 May
  • Sydney: 11 May
  • Perth: 30 May
We have enjoyed high attendances in Adelaide and Melbourne and are looking forward to the rest of the series. The outcomes will be reported in the June Newsletter.  

A new Indigenous Advisory Council 

During February, the Prime Minister and Minister for Indigenous Affairs announced new members of the Prime Minister’s Indigenous Advisory Council. The new members of the Advisory Council are appointed for three years. They are:

  •        Andrea Mason – CEO, NPY Women’s Council
  •        Susan Murphy – CEO, Winun Ngari Aboriginal Corporation
  •        Ngiare Brown – Founding Director of NGAOARA
  •        Roy Ah See – Chair, New South Wales Aboriginal Land Council
  •        Chris Sarra – Founder and Chairman, Stronger Smarter Institute
  •        Djambawa Marawilli – Traditional owner from Baniyala

This is a shift towards a smaller, all Indigenous membership compared to the previous council under former Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Significantly Dr Ngiare Brown is the only member of the previous Council to be reappointed. With her strong commitment to the health and wellbeing of our people, she stands us in good stead in the health arena. Each member of the new council has been appointed under a specific area of expertise. 


CATSINaM’s Nursing and Midwifery Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework 

There was a hive of activity from January to March on this initiative. The finishing touches were put on the final draft of the Nursing and Midwifery Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework (N&M Framework) that was then presented at seven Orientation Workshops held in February 2017 in: Townsville, Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth, Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra. Special thanks go to Ali Drummond, Robyn Williams and Angela Phillips – all CATSINaM Members and member of the Initiative Steering Group – who co-facilitated the workshops with Kathleen Stacey.

There were 140 participants in total representing 30 of the 35 universities offering registered nursing and midwifery courses. As two further universities will undertake a School-specific workshop in the near future, we expect to reach in excess of 180 nursing and midwifery academics.
This will raise CATSINaM’s engagement to 32 of the 35 relevant universities or 91%.
Overall workshop satisfaction levels were very high, as over 93% of participants were very or extremely satisfied with the experience. Participants were asked what their main learnings were. They clustered under four main areas:

  1. Understanding and implementing the N&M Framework.     
  2. Mapping their curriculum to identify changes needed to achieve alignment     between their curriculum and the N&M Framework.​       
  3. The opportunity for peer exchange and learning based on sharing their current approaches and new plans for curriculum design and content.
  4. ​Information on accessing potential resources, i.e. via the Indigenous HealthInfoNet as well as other example resources shared at the workshops

So, what is next for this initiative? The Board has endorsed the final version of the N&M Framework – it will be available on the CATSINaM Resources web page by the end of April. If you work in universities, and whether or not you attended the workshop, you can access a copy here. There are a few minor changes to the version that was presented at the workshop to reflect input offered by participants on that final draft.

Over the remainder of 2017, CATSINaM will partner with the Indigenous HealthInfoNet to develop a resource portal that will complement the N&M Framework. It will provide streamlined access to a range of potential resources that are already listed on the Indigenous HealthInfoNet but can be searched based on how they link to one of the four curriculum content themes from the N&M Framework:

  • Theme 1: Cultural safety.
  • Theme 2: History and diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the post-colonial experience and implications for population health and health care practice.
  • Theme 3: Partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals, organisations and communities.
  • Theme 4:  Clinical practice, service delivery and achieving culturally safe health care systems.

Based on the workshop outcomes, the Board agreed that CATSINaM will not pursue the development of an accompanying ‘Interpretive Guide’. Rather, CATSINaM will continue its efforts to secure funding for establishing a Leaders in Indigenous Nursing and Midwifery Education Network. This will be an important and ongoing support mechanism for effective implementation of the Nursing and Midwifery Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework through which good practice can be fostered and shared.


Cultural Safety in the Enrolled Nurse Qualifications with the VET sector

It has become increasingly apparent there is a need to examine the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health curriculum requirements in the VET sector for Enrolled Nursing. CATSINaM has received a steady number of inquiries over the last year from RTOs about the adequacy of their curriculum, particularly for the ‘CHCDIV002 Promote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural safety’ unit of competence. This need was also expressed by the N&M Framework Steering Committee, and universities who deliver Diploma qualifications and/or create pathways from the Diploma into registered nursing and midwifery courses.

The Board has confirmed that CATSINaM should launch a Cultural Safety in the Enrolled Nurse Qualifications Initiative in May 2017 so there is a greater consistency across the nursing and midwifery career pathway on addressing cultural safety and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health within curriculum. The priority audience will be RTOs with the EN qualifications on scope, or who want to get them on scope, and need to meet the requirements for the revised CHCDIV002. We know that ~52 RTOs currently have it on scope.

The main purpose will be to create and then promote a National Resource on the content, delivery and assessment of the ‘CHCDIV002 Promote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural safety’ unit of competence. In addition, a component of the initiative will develop a pool of potential trainers and assessors for RTOs. We intend to survey the CATSINaM Membership and consult interested Members about the process for becoming a trainer and/or assessor if they are not currently involved with RTOs. We will keep you updated along the way as this important initiative develops and progresses further.


Universities Australia Indigenous Strategy 2017-2020

Universities Australia recently announced ambitious new targets for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students across higher education as part of its Indigenous Strategy 2017-2020. Australian universities will seek to increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students enrolled in university by 50% above the growth rate of non-Indigenous students, and ensure equal success and completion rates for Indigenous students compared to non-Indigenous students in the same field of study.

The Universities Australia Indigenous Strategy is wide-ranging and ambitious, covering actions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, academic staff, research and knowledge development, cross-cultural training and partnerships with community. Most notably it opens the door to clearly advance several priorities for CATSINaM, especially the recruitment and retention of nursing and midwifery students and embedding cultural safety into nursing and midwifery curricula. We will look at how we can work with Schools of Nursing and Midwifery across the higher education sector to leverage the strategy and implement its targets in line with CATSINaM’s vision.  


Independent review of the health professional accreditation systems 

An independent review of the health professional accreditation systems within the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme is currently underway to ensure that accreditation of education for health professionals is cost effective, relevant and responsive. The Review, being conducted by Professor Michael Woods, will focus on improvements that can be made to the health education accreditation system to help create a workforce for Australia’s health care needs both now and in the future. Public consultations for the review were held throughout Australia in March and stakeholders are invited to make submissions to the review by 1st May 2017.

CATSINaM attended a consultation in Canberra and will be making a submission to the Review which will focus on how cultural safety can be best embedded into health professionals’ education using the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan, international examples of how cultural safety can be reflected in nursing and midwifery education and training, and other evidence to support our proposals. For further information about the Review see here

The new Cultural Respect Framework 2016-2026

On 28 October 2016 the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council launched the National Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2016-2026 as a renewal of the previous 2004-2009 Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health.

The Cultural Respect Framework seeks to guide the delivery of culturally safe, responsive and quality health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities across Australia. It was developed by the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Standing Committee for the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council.

The Cultural Respect Framework’s guiding principles are the same as the previous framework: leadership and responsibility, health equality and a human rights approach, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community and consumer engagement; partnerships, and monitoring and accountability. They closely align to the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

Importantly, unlike the previous version, the new Cultural Respect Framework explicitly focuses on tackling racism and discrimination as key social determinants of health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. It also uses definitions from CATSINaM’s publications on cultural awareness and cultural safety.  The six domains and focus areas of the framework are:

  • whole-of-organisation approach and commitment
  • communication
  • workforce development and training
  • consumer participation and engagement
  • stakeholder partnerships and collaboration
  • data, planning, research and evaluation.

As a national document, endorsed by all Australian Health Ministers, the new Cultural Respect Framework is an important and powerful reference for CATSINaM Members to use in advocating for a culturally safe and responsive health system for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. 


CRANAplus – important issues for remote health

Each year CRANAplus develops a list of key issues for remote health to inform their advocacy work. In 2016 CRANAplus listed the social determinants of health as the number one priority for improving the health status of Australians living in remote areas, with the need for access to contemporary evidence-based maternity care as a close second. Their list also included a focus on initiatives that are priorities for CATSINaM - to increase the remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce, and embed cultural safety into remote health care.

CATSINaM will continue to work with our colleagues at CRANAplus to advocate on these priorities, as well as promote a holistic approach to the social determinants of health, and progress the ‘Birthing on Country’ agenda in line with our joint position statement on the topic. 


Have you been to our Vimeo site?

CATSINaM established the CATSINaM Vimeo site in 2016. We now have nine videos uploaded there and expect to expand this over 2017. They include videos of our national events, e.g. on leadership, Closing the Gap, the 2016 ‘Unmasking our Heroes’ CATSINaM Awards, Member stories, and presentations by Janine Mohamed and Professor Dennis McDermott at the 2016 Cultural safety in Policy and Practice Seminar.

So if you are looking for resources that address the needs and interests of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives and Aboriginal health for your work area, lectures or professional development training, please visit and utilise CATSINaM’s work.